Chapter 11

Analyze a Click Path and Funnel

By Anna Tomalik

Once you have defined goals for your website, you may start wondering how exactly visitors reach each particular goal. Is there a familiar path that visitors take to arrive at the signup page? And what happens when they go through the signup process? Do all visitors complete the signup? And if not, why do they quit?

There are no simple answers to these questions, but we do have tools that can shed some light on how people reach goals and what happens along the way. Click path and funnel features are these tools.

Turn the click path on

Click path is an Analytics feature that collects information about pages that a visitor went through prior to reaching a goal. For example, when a visitor enters our website, skips to a product page, and finishes signing up, click path records this journey. The click path feature will analyze the paths of all visitors and deliver a report that shows you the well-worn paths.

To turn click path on, follow these steps:

  1. Go to Menu > Analytics settings.
  2. Navigate to ClickPath settings.
  3. Scroll down until you see Manage Goals and click the radio button next to the goal for which you want to activate the click path.
  4. Define how many elements you want to see on the click path.
  5. Define page URLs that you want to exclude from the click path. In our case, we want to ignore pages from the signup process like https://clearbank/sign-up/, https://clearbank/contact-info/, and https://clearbank/identity/. Leave only the page from the last step of the signup process.
  6. When done, click Save.

Once click path is turned on for the goal, Piwik PRO will start collecting data and you will soon be able to see it in the click path report.

To view the click path report, follow these steps:

  1. Go to Menu > Analytics.
  2. Navigate to Goals.
  3. Click the name of the goal you want to work with.
  4. Navigate to Click path.
  5. View the report.

The click path report will show you how many conversions happened along each path, the average time that visitors needed to complete the goal, and the percentage of conversions that took place along each path. By analyzing these numbers you’ll learn which path is working well, and this information can serve as a guide for designing a better website structure for your visitors.

Turn the funnel on

After setting up the click path, you can create a funnel. The funnel is an Analytics feature that helps you understand how people progress along a defined path and see where they drop out.   For example, you can observe how visitors move through the signup process and spot the places where they decide to leave.

To turn the funnel on, follow these steps:

  1. Go to Menu > Analytics.
  2. Navigate to Goals.
  3. Click Manage Goals.
  4. Click Edit for the goal you want to work with.
  5. Set steps for the funnel. For example, we’ll set three steps for the App signup goal, which are the steps of the signup process.
  6. When done, click Activate.

Once you’ve made the funnel active, Piwik PRO will start collecting data, and you will soon be able to see it in a funnel report. Keep in mind that you can’t edit an active funnel, and to make any changes you need to deactivate it. Also, any funnel step that you change will become active only for future reports.

To view the funnel report, follow these steps:

  1. Go to Menu > Analytics.
  2. Navigate to Funnels.
  3. Click the name of the goal for which you want to see the funnel.
  4. View the report.

By looking at the funnel report, you’ll be able to see how many visitors who entered the first step of the funnel completed the next steps. Also, you will see the page they viewed before and after each step. For example, in our case of tracking the signup process, we’ll see pages visitors viewed prior to the first steps and the pages to which visitors clicked out.

A bit more about funnels

We’ve shown you an example of tracking the signup process, which is a closed path. It leads only from A to B to C to D, and you can’t enter points B, C, or D from other pages. But you can activate a funnel for a different goal and set steps that are not exclusive to one process. For example, you may have a goal of reaching a pricing page, for which create a funnel that you assume visitors go through before reaching this page. And if you don’t want to assume that, you can analyze click paths, select the one that is most commonly followed, and use it as the baseline for the steps in your funnel. The only thing that remains is analyzing all the data, drawing conclusions, and planning improvements. We’re sure you’re a master at doing that!